tinea%20capitis%20(pediatric)
TINEA CAPITIS (PEDIATRIC)
Tinea capitis lesions are a type of contagious dermatophytosis that are found on the scalp, hair follicles and/or surrounding skin.
It is most common in the crowded areas as infection originates from contact with a pet or an infected person and asymptomatic carriage persists indefinitely.
It primarily affects children 3-7 year of age.
The causative agents are the genus Trichophyton and Microsporum.
Cardinal clinical feature is the combination of inflammation with hair breakage and loss.

Patient Education

  • Educate the patient/guardian about the contagiousness of the disease
    • Explain that sharing of toys or personal objects (eg combs & hairbrushes) can spread the infection, thus should be avoided
    • Identify & treat asymptomatic carriers including family members, caretakers & playmates
    • Treat or remove animals or pets infected w/ M. canis
    • Disinfect belongings of infected patients such as hairbrushes, combs, beddings, etc
  • Reassure the parent/caregiver that patients receiving treatment for Tinea capitis may attend school
  • Haircuts, shaving of the head & wearing a cap during treatment are usually unnecessary
  • Follow-up visits are needed for assessment of treatment response
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS JPOG - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Roshini Claire Anthony, Yesterday

Individuals with moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis may reap better long-term improvements in the severity of their condition when treated with guselkumab over secukinumab, according to findings of the phase III ECLIPSE* trial presented at the recent Inflammatory Skin Disease Summit (ISDS 2018) held in Vienna, Austria.

Jairia Dela Cruz, 11 Jan 2019
Use of standard-dose aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) appears to confer protection against the risk of endometrial cancer in overweight and obese women, according to a meta-analysis.
04 Jan 2019
Obstructive sleep apnoea may increase the risk of male-pattern baldness in men with a family history of hair loss, and this association appears to be mediated by low serum transferrin saturation levels related to hypoxia, a study suggests.
Elvira Manzano, 2 days ago
Treatment with two investigational, oral JAK inhibitors may be beneficial in individuals with moderate‐to‐severe alopecia areata (spot baldness), an autoimmune disease that can cause a lot of anxiety, according to an ongoing phase II study.