tinea%20capitis%20(pediatric)
TINEA CAPITIS (PEDIATRIC)
Tinea capitis lesions are a type of contagious dermatophytosis that are found on the scalp, hair follicles and/or surrounding skin.
It is most common in the crowded areas as infection originates from contact with a pet or an infected person and asymptomatic carriage persists indefinitely.
It primarily affects children 3-7 year of age.
The causative agents are the genus Trichophyton and Microsporum.
Cardinal clinical feature is the combination of inflammation with hair breakage and loss.

Patient Education

  • Educate the patient/guardian about the contagiousness of the disease
    • Explain that sharing of toys or personal objects (eg combs & hairbrushes) can spread the infection, thus should be avoided
    • Identify & treat asymptomatic carriers including family members, caretakers & playmates
    • Treat or remove animals or pets infected w/ M. canis
    • Disinfect belongings of infected patients such as hairbrushes, combs, beddings, etc
  • Reassure the parent/caregiver that patients receiving treatment for Tinea capitis may attend school
  • Haircuts, shaving of the head & wearing a cap during treatment are usually unnecessary
  • Follow-up visits are needed for assessment of treatment response
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