tinea%20capitis%20(pediatric)
TINEA CAPITIS (PEDIATRIC)
Tinea capitis lesions are a type of contagious dermatophytosis that are found on the scalp, hair follicles and/or surrounding skin.
It is most common in the crowded areas as infection originates from contact with a pet or an infected person and asymptomatic carriage persists indefinitely.
It primarily affects children 3-7 year of age.
The causative agents are the genus Trichophyton and Microsporum.
Cardinal clinical feature is the combination of inflammation with hair breakage and loss.

Differential Diagnosis

  • Psoriasis
  • Seborrheic dermatitis
  • Pityriasis amiantacea
  • Lichen simplex
  • Alopecia areata
  • Scarring alopecias
  • Bacterial infections (folliculitis, carbuncles)
  • Trichotillomania
  • Hairdressing accidents
  • Neoplasm
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