rubella
RUBELLA
Rubella, also known as German measles or 3-day measles, is a mild often exanthematous disease of infants and children that is severe and associated with complications in adults. It is self-limiting disease associated with a characteristic maculopapular rash.
It is caused by a single-stranded RNA virus classified as a togavirus, genus Rubivirus.
Transmission is through airborne or droplets shed from respiratory secretions.
Highly communicable at the onset of the rash, however viral shedding may also occur 5-7 days before, to 5-7 days or more following appearance of the rash.
The incubation period is 14-21 days.

Patient Education

  • Assure parents that the disease is generally benign, self-limiting & w/o complications
  • High-risk individuals to acquire the disease are those who are unimmunized & potentially pregnant family members
  • Isolation of patients from susceptible individuals should be done for 7 days after the rash onset
    • CRS patients should be maintained in contact precautions as they may shed the virus up to 1 yr of age
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