rosacea
ROSACEA
Rosacea is a chronic cutaneous disease of the convexities of the central face (cheeks, chin, nose and central forehead) w/ periorbital and perioral skin sparing. This condition is attributed to chronic vasodilation.
Remissions and exacerbations are common.
It typically appears after 30 years of age but may occur at any age.  It commonly affects fair-skinned individuals.
The common presenting symptoms are facial flushing, stinging/burning erythema, telangiectasia, edema, papules, pustules, ocular lesions, and hypertrophy of the sebaceous glands of the nose with fibrosis.
A history of episodic flushing often heralds onset of rosacea.

Patient Education

  • Patient should be informed that there is no cure for rosacea and that the available treatment options can only delay the progression of symptoms
  • The most important steps are to avoid precipitating and aggravating factors
  • Educate on the regular use of sunscreens, proper skin care, and importance of follow-up for ocular symptoms
    • Patients with ocular features should use ultraviolet-coated sunglasses and practice lid hygiene which includes warm compresses, dilute baby shampoo scrubs, application of lubricating eyedrops and meibomian gland expression
  • Consider a referral to:
    • A dermatologist if symptoms are more severe and acne are refractory to treatment
    • An ophthalmologist if patients with ocular rosacea have persistent or serious ocular symptoms
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