rhinitis%20-%20allergic
RHINITIS - ALLERGIC
Allergic rhinitis is a symptomatic disorder of the nose secondary to IgE-mediated inflammation of the nasal membranes induced after exposure to allergens.
Major symptoms include nasal itching, watery rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction/congestion, sneezing and postnasal drainage.
Other symptoms include headache, conjunctival symptoms, eye pruritus, impaired smell and morning cough.
Symptoms can reverse spontaneous w/ or w/o treatment.
Drug Information

Indication: Symptomatic treatment of seasonal & perennial allergic rhinitis.

Indication: Bronchial asthma.

Indication: Regular treatment of asthma where use of combination (inhaled corticosteroid & long-acting β2

Indication: Symptomatic relief of nasal & nasopharyngeal congestion. Facilitates intranasal exam or before nasal surge...

Indication: Bronchodilator for maintenance treatment of bronchospasm associated w/ COPD including chronic bronchitis &...

Indication: Bronchodilator for maintenance treatment of bronchospasm, associated w/ COPD, including chronic bronchitis, em...

Indication: Bronchodilator for the prevention & treatment of symptoms in chronic obstructive airway disorders w/ rever...

Indication: Bronchodilator for the prevention & treatment of symptoms in chronic obstructive airway disorders w/ rever...

Indication: Relief of symptoms associated w/ allergic rhinitis & common cold including nasal congestion, sneezing, rhi...

Indication: Relief of symptoms associated w/ allergic rhinitis & common cold including nasal congestion, sneezing, rhi...

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