psoriatic%20arthritis
PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS
Treatment Guideline Chart
Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with cutaneous psoriasis.
It is a progressive disease with asymmetric joint distribution pattern and rheumatoid factor is negative.
It can develop at any time including childhood but most often occurs between 30-50 years old.
Symptoms may range from mild to very severe.

Psoriatic%20arthritis Signs and Symptoms

Introduction

  • Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory seronegative spondyloarthropathy associated with psoriasis
  • 6-41% of patients with psoriasis may develop psoriatic arthritis
  • Usually develops after an average of 12 years of cutaneous manifestations
    • Dermatologists are encouraged to monitor for signs and symptoms of psoriatic arthritis every visit
    • All patients suspected of having psoriatic arthritis should be assessed by a rheumatologist so that an early diagnosis can be made and joint damage can be reduced 
  • Can develop at any time including childhood but most often occurs between 30-50 years old
  • Affects men and women equally

Signs and Symptoms

  • Signs and symptoms include:
    • Peripheral joint pain, stiffness and swelling
    • Axial joint pain, stiffness and swelling
    • Tenderness of the joint and surrounding ligaments and tendons
    • Presence of skin and nail lesions
    • Enthesitis, tenosynovitis and dactylitis
    • Extra-articular manifestations (ie uveitis) 
  • Symptoms range from mild to very severe
    • Severity of the skin disease and the arthritis do not correlate with each other
    • Nail disease is commonly found in patients with psoriatic arthritis especially those with distal interphalangeal joint involvement
    • Patients with axial involvement tend to have earlier onset of arthritis, more severe nail onycholysis, symptoms of inflammatory back pain and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)
    • Psoriatic arthritis may start slowly with mild symptoms or may be preceded by a joint injury
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