psoriatic%20arthritis
PSORIATIC ARTHRITIS
Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory arthropathy associated with cutaneous psoriasis.
It is a progressive disease with asymmetric joint distribution pattern and rheumatoid factor is negative.
It can develop at any time including childhood but most often occurs between 30-50 years old.
Symptoms may range from mild to very severe.

Introduction

  • Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammatory seronegative spondyloarthropathy associated w/ psoriasis
  • 6-42% of patients w/ psoriasis may develop psoriatic arthritis
  • Usually develops after an average of 12 yr of cutaneous manifestations
    • Dermatologists are encouraged to monitor for signs & symptoms of psoriatic arthritis every visit
    • All patients suspected of having psoriatic arthritis should be assessed by a rheumatologist so that an early diagnosis can be made & joint damage can be reduced 
  • Can develop at any time including childhood but most often occurs between 30-50 yr old
  • Affects men & women equally

Signs and Symptoms

  • Signs & symptoms include:
    • Peripheral joint pain, stiffness & swelling
    • Axial joint pain, stiffness & swelling
    • Tenderness of the joint & surrounding ligaments & tendons
    • Presence of skin & nail lesions
    • Enthesitis, tenosynovitis & dactylitis
    • Extra-articular manifestations (ie uveitis) 
  • Symptoms range from mild to very severe
    • Severity of the skin disease & the arthritis do not correlate w/ each other
    • Nail disease is commonly found in patients w/ psoriatic arthritis especially those w/ distal interphalangeal joint involvement
    • Psoriatic arthritis may start slowly w/ mild symptoms or may be preceded by a joint injury
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Rheumatology digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
11 Oct 2018
Use of statin appears to reduce the risks of osteoporosis, hip fractures and vertebral fracture in patients newly diagnosed with a stroke, suggests a recent study.
4 days ago
Elderly adults using hypoglycaemic glucose-lowering drugs, such as insulin and glinides, have an excess risk of hospitalization for serious trauma, a recent study has found.
Pearl Toh, 5 days ago

The duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) should be individualized based on ischaemic and bleeding risk of a particular patient, rather than focusing on a dualistic short- vs long-duration therapy thinking, advocates a leading expert during AFCC 2018.

07 Oct 2018
Patients using long-acting opioids with immunosuppressive properties are at greater risk of developing serious infections compared with those using the nonimmunosuppressive opioid counterpart, according to a study.