primary%20open-angle%20glaucoma
PRIMARY OPEN-ANGLE GLAUCOMA
Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a chronic, progressive, usually bilateral disease of the eye with an insidious onset.
It is most often characterized by optic nerve damage, defects in the retinal fiber layer and subsequent visual field loss in the absence of underlying ocular disease or congenital abnormalities.
It is generally asymptomatic until it has caused a significant loss of visual field.
Occasionally, patients with very high intraocular pressure may complain of nonspecific headache, discomfort, intermittent blurring of vision or even halos caused by corneal edema.

Patient Education

  • Inform & involve patients about the status of their condition, the goals & plans for managing their disease, as well as the risks & benefits involved in such interventions
  • Form a therapeutic alliance w/ patient & family, & stress that glaucoma is a chronic disease where treatment & follow-up is life-long
  • Educate patients on how to recognize significant changes in their condition so physicians may be alerted
  • Provide emotional support & encouragement to help patients deal w/ possible issues concerning employment, relationships, diminished functional capacities (eg driving, reading, performance of everyday tasks, sports-related activities)
  • Patients may be referred to support groups or provided counseling
  • Patients should be taught how to perform nasolacrimal occlusion or eyelid closure when applying topical medications to reduce systemic absorption
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
5 days ago
Elderly adults using hypoglycaemic glucose-lowering drugs, such as insulin and glinides, have an excess risk of hospitalization for serious trauma, a recent study has found.
Pearl Toh, 6 days ago

The duration of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) should be individualized based on ischaemic and bleeding risk of a particular patient, rather than focusing on a dualistic short- vs long-duration therapy thinking, advocates a leading expert during AFCC 2018.

07 Oct 2018
Patients using long-acting opioids with immunosuppressive properties are at greater risk of developing serious infections compared with those using the nonimmunosuppressive opioid counterpart, according to a study.
4 days ago
Rather than the presence or type or urinary incontinence, increasing severity of urinary incontinence correlates with increased depression, anxiety and stress among treatment-seeking women with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), suggests a study.