pityriasis%20(tinea)%20versicolor%20(pediatric)
PITYRIASIS (TINEA) VERSICOLOR (PEDIATRIC)
Pityriasis (tinea) versicolor is a benign, superficial, common fungal infection localized to the stratum corneum.
It occurs most commonly in postpubertal individuals when the sebaceous glands are the most active.
Facial involvement is common in adolescents, but lesions are also found on the upper trunk, neck, arms, dorsum of the hand and pubis.
Patient presents with erythematous, hypo- or hyperpigmented macules or patches that may have a slight scale.
It is caused by the lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur.

Pityriasis%20(tinea)%20versicolor%20(pediatric) Signs and Symptoms

Definition

  • Common, benign, superficial fungal infection localized to the stratum corneum
    • Occurs most commonly in postpubertal individuals when the sebaceous glands are the most active

Etiology

  • Caused by lipophilic yeast Malassezia spp & M. furfur is the most common

Signs and Symptoms

  • Facial involvement is common in adolescents, but lesions are also found on the upper trunk, neck, arms, dorsum of the hand & pubis
    • Although sometimes it is generalized
  • Patient presents w/ erythematous, hypo- or hyperpigmented macules or patches that may have a slight scale
    • Pruritus may or may not be present
  • Lesions do not tan along w/ surrounding normal skin

Risk Factors

Factors that Promote Tinea Versicolor Infection:

  • High temperature & high humidity
    • Prominent in tropical & subtropical regions
  • Occlusive clothing
  • Oily skin
  • Application of oils to skin
  • Excessive sweating
  • Immunocompromise conditions, malnutrition & hereditary predisposition
  • High levels of plasma cortisol
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