pityriasis%20(tinea)%20versicolor%20(pediatric)
PITYRIASIS (TINEA) VERSICOLOR (PEDIATRIC)
Pityriasis (tinea) versicolor is a benign, superficial, common fungal infection localized to the stratum corneum.
It occurs most commonly in postpubertal individuals when the sebaceous glands are the most active.
Facial involvement is common in adolescents, but lesions are also found on the upper trunk, neck, arms, dorsum of the hand and pubis.
Patient presents with erythematous, hypo- or hyperpigmented macules or patches that may have a slight scale.
It is caused by the lipophilic yeast Malassezia furfur.

Laboratory Tests

Microscopy

  • Potassium hydroxide (KOH) examination of skin scrapings should confirm the diagnosis
    • Scales or debris are mounted in 10-15% KOH solution & viewed under light microscope
    • Short stubby hyphae & yeast cells will be visible (appears as “spaghetti & meatballs”)

Culture

  • Culture is not usually helpful because Malassezia spp is difficult to grow as it is part of the normal flora

Wood’s Light Exam

  • Malassezia spp shows pale yellow to white fluorescence on Wood’s light exam
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