pelvic%20inflammatory%20disease
PELVIC INFLAMMATORY DISEASE
Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is the ascent of bacteria from the vagina or cervix resulting in infection of the reproductive organs eg uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries. It may also be a complication of sexually transmitted infections.
The most common symptoms of PID are lower abdominal pain (crampy or dull) that usually starts a few days after the onset of the last menstrual period, dyspareunia, abnormal vaginal or cervical discharge, postcoital or irregular vaginal bleeding, dysuria, fever, nausea and vomiting, although some have minimal symptoms or silent pelvic inflammatory disease.

Differential Diagnosis

The presence of the following points in the history or the presence of these signs & symptoms increases the likelihood of an abdominal surgical problem or a gynecological condition other than pelvic inflammatory disease:

  •  Patients w/ these conditions should be referred for further surgical &/or gynecological evaluation
  • Missed/overdue period
  • Recent delivery/abortion/miscarriage
  • Bowel signs & symptoms
  • Abdominal guarding &/or rebound tenderness
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Abdominal mass
Differential Diagnosis
  • Ectopic pregnancy
  • Endometriosis 
  • Acute appendicitis
  • Adnexal tumors
  • Ovarian cyst or torsion
  • UTI
  • Irritable bowel syndrome
  • Functional pain (pain w/ no known physical cause)
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