otitis%20media%20-%20acute
OTITIS MEDIA - ACUTE
Otitis media is a general term used to describe inflammation of the middle ear which may be caused by an acute infection.
The symptoms are usually nonspecific and include otalgia (pulling of ear in an infant), irritability, otorrhea with or without fever.
Symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection may also be present.

Introduction

  • Otitis media is the general term used to describe fluid in & inflammation of the middle ear

Definition

  • Acute otitis media (AOM) is the inflammation may be caused by an acute infection or brought about by dysfunction of the Eustachian tube

Etiology

Acute Otitis Media (AOM)

  • Streptococcus pneumoniae & Haemophilus influenzae are the most common causes of AOM
  • Moraxella catarrhalis is occasionally isolated; group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus & S aureus are other rare causes

Signs and Symptoms

  • Commonly unilateral & include otalgia, otorrhea w/ or w/o fever, diminished hearing, dysequilibrium
  • Symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection (eg cough, nasal discharge or stuffiness, sore throat) or exacerbation of allergic rhinitis may also be present

Middle Ear Inflammation

  • Apparent erythema of the tympanic membrane
  • Otalgia is apparent by noticeable discomfort of the ears that causes interference w/ or prevents normal sleep or activity
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Infectious Diseases - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Tristan Manalac, 14 May 2020
Liver injuries appear to be more common in severe cases of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), a new meta-analysis reports.
16 May 2020
There appears to be no evidence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in the semen of patients recovering from COVID-19 a month after diagnosis, according to a study, suggesting that the virus is unlikely to gain entry into testicular cells through an ACE2/TMPRSS2-mediated mechanism.
Stephen Padilla, Yesterday
Herd immunity will not work in the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), according to an infectious disease expert who addressed over 3,600 primary care physicians (PCP) from Asia Pacific at the inaugural webcast of the MIMS COVID Conversations Series.
Jairia Dela Cruz, 15 May 2020
In the fight against the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, healthcare workers experience a range of physical symptoms, which are strongly related to psychological distress, according to a study, suggesting a bidirectional relationship between physical symptoms and psychological outcomes.