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OSTEOPOROSIS IN WOMEN
Osteoporosis is a progressive, systemic, skeletal disease characterized by decreased bone mass and microarchitectural deterioration of bone tissue leading to increased bone fragility and susceptibility to fractures.
The more risk factors (eg history of fracture, advanced age, comorbidities, etc) that are present, the greater the risk of fracture.

Surgical Intervention

  • Eg vertebroplasty, kyphoplasty
  • Management of osteoporotic fractures should involve both non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis, management of pain, and surgery only if necessary
  • Considered when treatment of acute symptomatic vertebral fractures are nonresponsive to conservative treatments
    • Not to be used as 1st-line treatment of vertebral fractures due to increased risk of fractures in adjacent vertebrae
  • Several studies have shown improvement in back pain after treatment with vertebroplasty cement augmentation
  • Kyphoplasty may partially reverse vertebral deformities and provide relief from pain
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