ophthalmia%20neonatorum
OPHTHALMIA NEONATORUM
Ophthalmia neonatorum is conjunctivitis occurring in a newborn during the first month of life.
It is also called neonatal conjunctivitis.
Organisms causing neonatal conjunctivitis are usually acquired from the infected birth canal of the mother during vaginal delivery, though some may acquire the infection from their immediate surroundings.
It is one of the leading cause of blindness in infants via corneal ulceration and subsequent opacification or perforation and endophthalmitis.

Patient Education

  • When appropriate, explain the natural history of the disease & the importance of prevention
  • Educate parents or caregiver to wash their hands frequently to prevent transmission of neonatal conjunctivitis
  • Educate pregnant women on:
    • The importance of having regular prenatal check up & prenatal care as prophylaxis
    • The importance of treating sexually transmitted infections to decrease the incidence of ophthalmia neonatorum
  • Emphasize the importance of treating the mother & her sexual partner(s) as usually the causative organism is sexually transmitted
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Yesterday
There appears to be a high rate of emergency department (ED) admission for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), with patients having significant in-hospital mortality, according to data from the *AANZDEM study. Furthermore, compliance with evidence-based treatments in the ED is suboptimal.
Tristan Manalac, 6 days ago
Of the newly identified genetic loci for primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG), two are significantly associated with primary angle-closure suspect (PACS), indicating involvement in the earlier stages of the disease, a recent Singapore study has shown.
3 days ago
Resistance training appears to confer significant benefits for inflammation and insulin pathway profiles in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors, according to a study. However, the magnitude and degree of benefit from exercise may be influenced by whether or not women gained strength and/or lost weight during exercise.
Pearl Toh, 3 days ago
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who had primary nonresponse to an anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) agent ─ or inadequate response to the initial loading doses ─ were less likely to respond to second-line biologics compared with those who had secondary loss of response (LOR) or intolerance to the primary therapy, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress (CCC) 2018 held recently in Las Vegas, Nevada, US.