narcolepsy
NARCOLEPSY

Narcolepsy is a chronic neurologic sleep disorder wherein the patient have excessive daytime sleepiness and rapid eye movement sleep is dysregulated.

It affects 1 in 1000 individuals, with prevalence of about 0.04% of general population.
The exact cause remains unclear.
Studies suggest a combination of genetic predisposition, abnormal neurotransmitter functioning and abnormal immune modulation.
Symptoms include excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, sleep-related hallucinations, automatic behavior, fragmented nocturnal sleep and insomnia.

Patient Education

Patient Education

  • Educate the patients regarding their condition & its implications at the time of diagnosis
  • Regular consultation between the patient & physician is essential to help patients modify their lifestyle & provide optimal management
  • Family support can also improve the course of the disease by helping the patients overcome challenges
  • Inform family members, friends, & co-workers of the signs of narcoleptic spells to help patients lessen possible injuries
  • Advise patients on their activities & jobs
    • Avoid potentially dangerous activities such as operating motor vehicles & machines when feeling sleepy
    • Avoid shift-work, driving, transportation-related jobs, or any work which requires continuous attention for long hours with breaks

Adequate & Regular Nocturnal Sleep

  • Patient should have adequate & regular nocturnal sleep to avoid exacerbating excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Comply with a strict sleep schedule of at least 7-8 hours of sleep at night with a consistent bedtime & time of morning awakening
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