multiple%20sclerosis
MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS
Multiple sclerosis is an acquired, chronic, immune-mediated, inflammatory disease of the brain and the spinal cord characterized by the presence of multiple discrete areas of myelin loss within the CNS and subsequent axonal degeneration.
It affects more women than men; however, men are more likely to have a malignant clinical course.
A multiple sclerosis attack is usually characterized by any neurological disturbance with minimum 24 hours duration in the absence of fever or infection.

Multiple%20sclerosis Patient Education

Patient Education

Patient and Family Education

  • Provide information about multiple sclerosis to the patient, the patient’s family and caregivers
  • Enable patient to make informed decisions regarding the course of diagnosis and therapy
  • Psychosocial, vocational, educational issues will need to be addressed without patient
  • Support groups may be helpful to patient
  • Encourage patient to exercise
  • Advise patient to take linoleic acid-rich food (eg corn, sunflower, soya and safflower oils)
  • Encourage patient to stop smoking as it can increase the progression of multiple sclerosis
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