melasma
MELASMA
Melasma is an acquired hypermelanosis skin disorder that commonly affects women than men. It is characterized by irregular light to dark brown macules occurring in the sun-exposed areas of the face, neck and arms.
It occurs most commonly with pregnancy and with the use of contraceptive pills.
Other factors implicated in the etiopathogenesis are photosensitizing medications, mild ovarian or thyroid dysfunction and certain cosmetics.
Solar and ultraviolet exposure is the most common important factor in its development.

Definition

  • Acquired hyperpigmentary skin disorder characterized by irregular light to dark brown macules occurring in the sun-exposed areas of the face, neck & arms
  • Occurs most commonly with pregnancy (chloasma) & with the use of contraceptive pills
  • Other factors implicated in the etiopathogenesis are photosensitizing medications, genetic factors, mild ovarian or thyroid dysfunction, & certain cosmetics
  • Most commonly affects Fitzpatrick skin phototypes III & IV 
  • More common in women than in men
  • Rare before puberty & common in women during their reproductive years
  • Solar & ultraviolet exposure is the most important factor in its development

Etiology

  • Other factors implicated in the etiopathogenesis are photosensitizing medications, mild ovarian or thyroid dysfunction, & certain cosmetics 
  • Solar & ultraviolet exposure is the most important factor in its development
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