kawasaki%20disease
KAWASAKI DISEASE
Kawasaki disease is an acute, febrile illness that is self-limited. It is a systemic vasculitic syndrome that primarily involves the medium- and small-sized muscular arteries of the body.
It is also known as mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome.
It affects primarily children <5 years old with peak incidence in 1-2 year of age.
The cause remains unknown but current research supports an infectious origin.
Epidemiological findings suggest that genetic predisposition and environmental factors play a role in the pathogenesis of the disease.

Differential Diagnosis

  • Many of the clinical features of Kawasaki disease may be present in other illnesses
  • Exclusion of other illnesses in the differential diagnosis is often necessary

Differential Diagnosis

  • Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome
  • Toxic shock syndrome
  • Scarlet fever
  • Bacterial cervical lymphadenitis
  • Viral infections [measles, adenovirus, enterovirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)]
  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome
  • Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
  • Rocky mountain spotted fever
  • Drug hypersensitivity reactions
  • Mercury hypersensitivity reaction (acrodynia)
  • Leptospirosis
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