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INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS
Infective endocarditis is microbial infection of the endovascular structures of the heart.
It often presents in an occult fashion and early diagnosis depends on a high index of clinical suspicion especially in patients with congenital heart disease, prosthetic valves or previous infective endocarditis.
The established diagnosis of infective endocarditis is demonstrated by a positive blood culture and involvement of the endocardium detected during sepsis or systemic infection. It may also be established if there is involvement of the endocardium detected during sepsis or systemic infection but blood culture is negative.

Follow Up

  • Daily exam including temp & periodic blood tests to monitor for signs of infection
    • Temp should normalize w/in 5-10 days w/ uncomplicated IE
  • Continue to monitor for cardiac murmurs, BP, signs of HF & embolism in the CNS, lungs, spleen & skin
  • Secondary infections in joint & spine may occur
  • C-reactive protein (CRP) decreases rapidly during 1st or 2nd wk of therapy but may stay slightly elevated for 4-6 wk or longer
    • Persistently high CRP typically means an inadequately controlled infection
  • Normalization of WBC should also occur w/in 1-2 wk
    • Persistently elevated WBC indicates active infection
  • Monitor renal function
  • Good oral & overall hygiene are recommended for risk reduction

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