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IMPETIGO & ECTHYMA
Impetigo is a very contagious, superficial, bacterial skin infection that easily spreads among people in close contact.
Most cases occur in children and resolve spontaneously without scarring in approximately 14 days.
Ecthyma is a deeply ulcerated form of impetigo that extends to the dermis.
It has "punched-out" ulcers with yellow crust and elevated violaceous margins.
Most cases occur in children and elderly.
It may be a de novo infection or superinfection.

Prevention

  • Prompt attention to minor wounds eg keeping them clean & applying topical antibiotic
  • Use of insect repellant to prevent insect bites
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