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IMPETIGO & ECTHYMA
Impetigo is a very contagious, superficial, bacterial skin infection that easily spreads among people in close contact.
Most cases occur in children and resolve spontaneously without scarring in approximately 14 days.
Ecthyma is a deeply ulcerated form of impetigo that extends to the dermis.
It has "punched-out" ulcers with yellow crust and elevated violaceous margins.
Most cases occur in children and elderly.
It may be a de novo infection or superinfection.

Diagnosis

  • Diagnosis is usually based on clinical presentation

Laboratory Tests

  • Tests are not necessary in most cases because diagnosis is made on clinical grounds
  • Gram stain &/or culture may be used to confirm the diagnosis when the clinical presentation is unclear or if the patient fails first treatment
    • Gram stain smears of vesicles show Gram-positive cocci
    • Culture & sensitivity test reveals the causative agents & the appropriate therapy especially when resistant organisms are suspected
  • Take blood cultures when patient appears ill & when infection is severe, recurrent, suspected to be an outbreak, or suspected to be caused by Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA)

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