hypothyroidism
HYPOTHYROIDISM
Hypothyroidism is a common endocrine disorder where in the thyroid does not make enough thyroid hormone.
Subclinical/mild hypothyroidism refers to the state of slightly increased serum TSH with normal serum FT4 in patients who are usually asymptomatic.
Most common cause of primary hypothyroidism is autoimmune thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease.
Levothyroxine is the first-line agent for treatment of hypothyroidism.

Hypothyroidism Management

Follow Up

  • Follow up exam should be done every 6-8 weeks for patients with primary hypothyroidism or 4-8 weeks for patients with subclinical/mild hypothyroidism initially to monitor patient's response to the dose of Levothyroxine until TSH is normalized and every 6-8 weeks for patients with central hypothyroidism initially to monitor patient's response to the dose of Levothyroxine to maintain FT4 above the median value of normal range
  • Then every 6-12 months for patients with primary hypothyroidism and every 12 months for patients with subclinical/mild or central hypothyroidism
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