hand,%20foot%20-and-%20mouth%20disease
HAND, FOOT & MOUTH DISEASE
Hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) is characterized by fever, vesicular stomatitis, and papular/vesicular lesions located peripherally (ie palms of hands, knees, soles of feet, buttocks or genitalia).
Oral vesicular lesions are 1-3 mm, mostly found on the buccal mucosa, tongue and soft palate.
Each oral lesion is surrounded by erythema and is tender to touch.
Patient may complain of sore throat or sore mouth, fever and may be difficult to feed.
Most common cause of HFMD is coxsackievirus A16 (A16).

Prevention

  • Good hygiene
    • Handwashing
    • Clean dirty surfaces & soiled toys & clothing
    • Avoid close contact w/ infected person

Vaccines

  • Enterovirus 71 vaccine
    • A vaccine against EV71 that is currently being developed but needs further studies to prove efficacy
    • One study revealed a 90% efficacy against hand, foot & mouth disease (HFMD) & 80.4% efficacy against EV71-associated diseases
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