gout
GOUT
Gout is a condition that resulted from deposition of monosodium urate crystals in various tissues (eg joints, connective tissue, kidney).
The patient experiences acute and chronic arthritis, soft tissue inflammation, tophus formation, gouty nephropathy and nephrolithiasis.
Primary hyperuricemia is called when uric acid saturation arises without coexisting diseases or drugs that alter uric acid production and excretion.
While in secondary hyperuricemia there is an excessive uric acid production or diminished renal clearance that occurs as a result of a disease, drug, dietary product or toxin.

Introduction

  • Gout is a condition wherein increased uric acid or urate in the body, also called hyperuricemia, leads to deposition of monosodium urate monohydrate (MSU) crystals in various tissues (eg joints, connective tissue, kidney)
  • Hyperuricemia is a necessary precondition for the development of MSU crystal deposition but this has to be distinguished from gout, the clinical syndrome
  • Results in acute and chronic inflammation associated with changes in articular & periarticular structures
  • Affects up to 1-2% of adults & is the most common inflammatory arthritis in men
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