genital%20herpes
GENITAL HERPES
Genital herpes is a recurrent lifelong disease with no cure, caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV).
HSV-2 is usually the cause but HSV-1 may occur in up to 1/3 of new cases.
HSV-1 tends to cause fewer recurrences & milder disease than HSV-2.
The incubation period is 2 days-2 weeks after exposure.

Introduction

  • Recurrent lifelong disease with no cure, caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV)
  • Typically occurs in adults, usually transmitted through sexual contact 
  • Incubation period is 2 days-2 weeks after exposure

Etiology

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)
  • HSV-1: Tends to cause fewer recurrences and milder disease than HSV-2
  • HSV-2: Usually the cause of genital herpes but HSV-1 may occur in up to 1/3 of new cases

Risk Factors

Risk Factors for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection
  • Multiple sexual partners
  • Previous history of sexually transmitted infection (STI) including HIV
  • History of genital lesion in self or partner
  • Partner diagnosed with genital HSV infection
  • Early age of 1st sexual activity (≤17 years old)
  • Female gender
  • Low socioeconomic status; low level of education
  • Advancing age
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