genital%20herpes
GENITAL HERPES
Genital herpes is a recurrent lifelong disease with no cure, caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV).
HSV-2 is usually the cause but HSV-1 may occur in up to 1/3 of new cases.
HSV-1 tends to cause fewer recurrences & milder disease than HSV-2.
The incubation period is 2 days-2 weeks after exposure.

Introduction

  • Recurrent lifelong disease with no cure, caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV)
  • Typically occurs in adults, usually transmitted through sexual contact 
  • Incubation period is 2 days-2 weeks after exposure

Etiology

Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)
  • HSV-1: Tends to cause fewer recurrences and milder disease than HSV-2
  • HSV-2: Usually the cause of genital herpes but HSV-1 may occur in up to 1/3 of new cases

Risk Factors

Risk Factors for Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infection
  • Multiple sexual partners
  • Previous history of sexually transmitted infection (STI) including HIV
  • History of genital lesion in self or partner
  • Partner diagnosed with genital HSV infection
  • Early age of 1st sexual activity (≤17 years old)
  • Female gender
  • Low socioeconomic status; low level of education
  • Advancing age
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Infectious Diseases - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Tristan Manalac, 6 days ago
Incorporating genotyping of human adenovirus (HAdV) infections in clinical practice may inform risk stratification and treatment decisions, according to a new Singapore study.
Tristan Manalac, 25 Oct 2019
Old age and lower white cell counts are significant risk factors for poor platelet recovery among dengue patients with thrombocytopaenia, according to a recent Singapore study.
4 days ago
A 10-day or 14-day sequential therapy strategy is more cost-effective than a conventional triple therapy in the management of patients with Helicobacter pylori infection, in addition to being more effective in terms of eradication of infection, as reported in a study from Egypt.
Tristan Manalac, 04 Sep 2019
A booster injection of CYD-TDV (Dengvaxia) can generally restore antidengue antibody titres 5 years after a three-dose schedule, according to a new Singapore study.