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GASTROENTERITIS - VIRAL
Acute gastroenteritis is a diarrheal disease of rapid onset.
Viruses are one of the common causes of gastroenteritis.
Rotavirus, enteric adenovirus serotypes 40 & 41, astrovirus and calicivirus (eg "Norwalk-like" virus) are the established viral agents causing gastroenteritis.
Rotavirus is the most common pathogen causing diarrhea in patients 3-24 months old.
Patients <3 months old are protected by maternal rotavirus antibodies that are passed transplacentally and possibly by breastfeeding.
Transmission is through fecal-oral route.
Incubation period may vary from 1-10 days depending on the causative agent.

Patient Education

  • Viral gastroenteritis is contagious, hence asymptomatic patients are advised not to play with infected patients
  • Appropriate sanitation measures (eg hand washing & housekeeping) should be observed at all times
  • Careful food preparation measures should be done
  • Appropriate measures in changing & disposal of diaper
  • Fomites should also be disinfected as viral spread from these objects has been reported
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