erectile%20dysfunction
ERECTILE DYSFUNCTION

Erectile dysfunction is the inability to attain and maintain an erection enough to have satisfactory sexual performance for ≥3 months.

It is when the patient complains of partial erection that could not attain vaginal penetration.

Complete loss of penile rigidity is uncommon.

Initial penile erections can penetrate but early detumescence occurs without ejaculation.

Patient Education

Patient & Partner Education

  • Some men may only need reassurance that decline in sexual function is due to aging, medication or chronic illnesses & is not necessarily a sign of serious illness
    • They may refuse treatment
  • Education & reassurance may help in preventing further erectile failure due to the above causes
  • Discuss w/ patient & partner (if possible) the important treatment options & their associated risks & benefits
  • Cultural, religious & economic factors should be taken into consideration
  • The choice of treatment should be decided together by physician, patient & partner

Lifestyle Modification

  • Modifying possible risk factors may be helpful
    • Resolving partner relationship issues
    • Smoking cessation
    • Reduce alcohol/drug abuse
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
27 Sep 2017
Sleep problems appear to be associated with progression of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in men with the urologic condition and with LUTS development among asymptomatic men, according to data from the REDUCE* study.
Tristan Manalac, 10 Oct 2017
Despite being common, less than half of Singaporean women have sought medical attention for urinary incontinence for fear of surgery, embarrassment and other misconceptions, a new study from Singapore has found
30 Jul 2016
Long-term testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is beneficial in men with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) in a study and is even associated with improvement in sexual function and vitality, physical pain, general health, and overall health-related quality of life (HRQoL).
5 days ago
Physiotherapy and behaviour therapy appear to be effective interventions in females with overactive bladder syndrome, with those who have had no previous exposure to the treatments benefitting from post-therapy effects, a recent study has shown.