dyspepsia
DYSPEPSIA

Dyspepsia is having any one of the following: Disturbing postprandial fullness, early satiation, epigastric pain and/or burning felt predominantly in the upper abdomen.

It is considered a symptom complex rather than a specific diagnosis.

Acid suppression is the recommended initial therapy.

Definition

  • Refers to pain or discomfort centered in the upper abdomen
    • Discomfort refers to a subjective sensation that the patient does not interpret as pain which may be characterized by or associated with upper abdominal fullness, early satiety, bloating, belching, nausea and vomiting (N/V)
    • Centered refers to pain or discomfort in or around the midline
  • Dyspepsia is considered a symptom complex rather than a specific diagnosis

Signs and Symptoms

  • Ulcer-like
    • Chronic or recurrent epigastric pain or discomfort for at least 2-4 weeks
  • Reflux-like
    • Acid regurgitation
    • Heartburn
  • Dysmotility-like
    • Bloating in upper abdomen not accompanied by visible distension
    • Early satiety
    • N/V
    • Postprandial fullness
    • Upper abdominal discomfort often aggravated by food
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