dysmenorrhea%20-%20primary
DYSMENORRHEA - PRIMARY
Primary dysmenorrhea is a painful menstruation without demonstrable pelvic disease.
Symptoms include intermittent painful spasms, crampy labor-like pain localized over the lower abdomen & the suprapubic area which may radiate to the lower back or inner thighs.
The pain may also be described as a dull ache or as a stabbing pain.
Accompanying symptoms include nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, lightheadedness, fatigue, fever, nervousness & fainting.

Patient Education

Patient (& Parents) Education

  • Explain to the patient the nature of her dysmenorrhea and give her a chance to ask questions regarding her anatomy
  • Provide reassurance that dysmenorrhea is a treatable condition and explain the treatment options
  • Motivate patient to adopt healthy lifestyle changes (eg stop smoking, exercise regularly, adopt a low-fat vegetarian diet, do relaxation techniques)
    • Explain that these modifications may decrease painful periods
  • Counsel patients on their treatments
    • Educate patients about the side effects of each treatment so they may report if there is any appearance of undesirable side effects
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS JPOG - Malaysia digital copy today!
Sign In To Download
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Dr Joslyn Ngu, 16 Mar 2018

A 2008 clinical practice guideline by the Endocrine Society for hirsutism in premenopausal women has been updated and published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2018-00241]

Pearl Toh, 16 Apr 2018
Oral micronized progesterone (OMP) may provide relief for perimenopausal women who had hot flashes and night sweats, according to a study presented at the ENDO 2018 Annual Meeting.
Audrey Abella, 29 Dec 2017
The use of oral contraceptives reduces the risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA), especially ACPA*-positive RA, according to the Swedish EIRA** study.

Tristan Manalac, 23 Dec 2017
Contemporary hormonal contraceptives appear to increase the risk of breast cancer, particularly in those with long durations of exposure, a recent study from Denmark has shown.