dyslipidemia
DYSLIPIDEMIA
Dyslipidemia is having an abnormal amount of lipids or fats in the blood.
Lipid profile is obtained from an individual with diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral arterial disease or other coronary heart disease risk factors or from an individual with family history or clinical evidence of familial hypercholesterolemia.
Plasma lipids are total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, trigylcerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.
Evaluation of lipid profile must be performed in parallel with the risk assessment of coronary heart disease.

Definition

  • An abnormality in lipoprotein metabolism that results in elevations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, triglycerides, and/or non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) levels, or significantly reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels
  • Increase in serum concentration of total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides or non-HDL-C is equivalent to increased risk for cardiovascular diseases

Etiology

  • Depends on the type of dyslipidemia
  • Hereditary disorders associated with dyslipidemia include familial hypercholesterolemia, familial hypertriglyceridemia, familial combined hyperlipidemia, familial dysbetalipoproteinemia, chylomicronemia
  • Secondary causes include diabetes mellitus, diet, alcohol intake, hypothyroidism, renal failure, obstructive liver disease, Cushing’s syndrome, metabolic syndrome, medications (glucocorticoids, beta-blockers, thiazides, estrogen therapy)
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