dengue
DENGUE
Treatment Guideline Chart

Dengue infection is caused by the dengue virus that belongs to the family Flaviviridae. It is generally self-limiting and rarely fatal.
There are 4 serotypes (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3, DEN-4). Infection with dengue serotype confers lifetime protective immunity to that specific serotype; cross-protection for other serotypes is only short-term.
It is transmitted to humans through the bites of infected Aedes mosquitoes. It is primarily transmitted by female Aedes aegypti, a tropical and subtropical species. Humans and monkeys are the amplifying hosts after the mosquito bite.
After 4-10 days of incubation period, illness begins immediately.
The acute phase of illness lasts for 3-7 days, but the convalescent phase may be prolonged for a week and may be associated with weakness and depression especially in adults.

Dengue References

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  2. Songco RS, Purugganan H, Carandang EH, et al. AdHoc Committee on Dengue Infections of the Philippine Pediatric Society. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome. Quezon City, PH: Philippine Pediatric Society Inc; 1998
  3. Philippine Pediatric Society Inc. Handbook of infectious diseases. Quezon City, PH: Philippine Pediatric Society Inc; 2004
  4. World Health Organization (WHO); Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Disease (TDR). Dengue: Guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control. WHO Press; 2009:25-106
  5. Malaria & Vector Borne Diseases Control Unit Disease Control Directorate Directorate General of Health Services Ministry of Health & Family Welfare & WHO Bangladesh. National guidelines for clinical management of dengue syndrome. 1st ed. Bangladesh: Disease Control Directorate of Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare of Government of Peoples Republic of Bangladesh; 2000.
  6. Gunn VL, Nechyba C, eds. The Harriet Lane Handbook: A Manual for Pediatric House Officers. 16th ed. St. Louis, MO: MD Consult LLC; 2002.
  7. MedWormhttp://www.medworm.com/rss/index.php/Pediatrics/33/http://www.medworm.com/rss/medicalfeeds/specialities/Pediatrics.xml
  8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Division of Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases. CDC Dengue Fever Homepage. CDC. http://www.cdc.gov/.
  9. Technical Working Group on the 2010 PPS Interim Guidelines on Fluid Management of DF/DHF. 2010 Interim guidelines on fluid management of dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. http://www.pps.org.ph/. Feb 2011. Accessed 29 Nov 2011.
  10. Ministry of Health Singapore. Clinical Guidelines on dengue fever (DF)/dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF). Ministry of Health Singapore. http://www.moh.gov.sg/. 2002.
  11. Shepherd S, Hinfey PB. Dengue fever. eMedicine. http://www.emedicine.com. Apr 2006.
  12. Ministry of Health Malaysia. Clinical practice guidelines: dengue infection in adults. http://www.moh.gov.my/. 2003.
  13. Tomashek, KM. Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. CDC. http://www.cdc.gov/. Accessed 25 Oct 2012.
  14. Chapter of Paediatrics, Academy of Medicine of Malaysia. Consensus statement on the management of dengue infection in the paediatric population. http://www.acadmed.org.my/. Jan 2000.
  15. World Health Organization. Dengue haemorrhagic fever: diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control. 2nd ed. Geneva: World Health Organization. WHO. http://www.who.int/. 1997.
  16. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue laboratory guidance and diagnostic testing. CDC. http://www.cdc.gov/. Accessed 19 Oct 2012.
  17. World Health Organization Regional Office for Southeast Asia. Guidelines for treatment of dengue fever/dengue hemorrhagic fever in small hospitals. WHO. http://www.searo.who.int/. 1999.
  18. World Health Organization (WHO) and Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR). Dengue: guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control - new edition. WHO Web Site. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/. 2009. Accessed 28 Nov 2011.
  19. Research Institute for Tropical Medicine Medical Department. Dengue. From: Management protocols of infectious and tropical diseases Volume one: Vector borne, zoonotic and other infectious diseases. Mar 2002
  20. National Institute of Communicable Diseases Delhi. Investigation & control of outbreaks: dengue fever & dengue hemorrhagic fever. Delhi: Directorate General of Health Services. http://idsp.nic.in/. 2001.
  21. World Health Organization Southeast Asia Regional Office. Regional guidelines on dengue/DHF prevention and control. WHO. http://http:w3.whosea.org/. 1999.
  22. Ministry of Health Malaysia. Management of dengue fever in children. Ministry of Health Malaysia Web Site. http://www.acadmed.org.my/. 2004. Accessed 19 Dec 2007.
  23. WHO Regional Office for South-East Asia. Comprehensive guidelines for prevention and control of dengue and dengue haemorrhagic fever. Revised and expanded edition 2011. World Health Organization. http://www.searo.who.int/.
  24. Guy B, Briand O, Lang J, et al. Development of the Sanofi Pasteur tetravalent dengue vaccine: one more step forward. Vaccine. 2015 Dec 10;33(50):7100-7111. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.09.108. PMID: 26475445
  25. World Health Organization. Immunization, vaccines and biologicals. Dengue vaccine research. WHO. http://www.who.int/. 14 Dec 2015. Accessed 12 Jan 2016.
  26. World Health Organization. Dengue and severe dengue. WHO. http://www.who.int. Apr 2017.
  27. World Health Organization. Dengue vaccine: WHO position paper, July 2016 - recommendations. Vaccine. 2017 Mar;35(9):1200-1201. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2016.10.070. PMID: 28185744
  28. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC Yellow Book 2018. Health Information for International Travel. CDC. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/. 2017.
  29. Philippine Pediatric Society, Pediatric Infectious Disease Society of the Philippines. 2017 PPS-PIDSP Clinical practice guidelines on dengue in children. Philippine Pediatric Society. https://pps.org.ph/. Jul 2017. Accessed 04 Sep 2017.
  30. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue vaccine globally. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. https://www.cdc.gov/. Jun 2021.
  31. Philippine Pediatric Society, Pediatric Infectious Society of the Philippines. A position statement from the Philippine Pediatric Society and Pediatric Infectious Society of the Philippines on the dengue vaccine. Pediatric Infectious Society of the Philippines. http://www.pidsphil.org/. 24 Aug 2021.
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