croup
CROUP
Croup is a viral infection that causes erythema and edema of the tracheal walls and narrowing of the subglottic region. It is often characterized by an acute, rapidly progressing respiratory disease.
It is a medical emergency in children and requiring immediate treatment.
Most common causes are parainfluenza virus 1&2 and respiratory syncytial virus.
Occurrence of symptoms is usually at night and with abrupt onset and improve during daytime.

Differential Diagnosis

Diphtheria
  • Characterized by malaise, sore throat, anorexia, & low-grade fever
  • Within 2-3 days, pharyngeal exam may show a typical gray-white membrane adherent to the tissue that bleeds when attempted to be removed
  • With insidious course but sudden respiratory obstruction may occur
Epiglottitis
  • Characterized by sudden onset of high fever, dysphagia, drooling & anxious appearance
  • Patient prefers to sit forward in sniffing position
  • Barking cough is rarely observed
Tracheitis
  • Patient appears febrile, toxic & gives poor response to Epinephrine
Other Causes of Stridor
  • Foreign body
  • Retropharyngeal abscess
  • Hereditary angioedema
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