croup
CROUP
Croup is a viral infection that causes erythema and edema of the tracheal walls and narrowing of the subglottic region. It is often characterized by an acute, rapidly progressing respiratory disease.
It is a medical emergency in children and requiring immediate treatment.
Most common causes are parainfluenza virus 1&2 and respiratory syncytial virus.
Occurrence of symptoms is usually at night and with abrupt onset and improve during daytime.

Diagnosis

Croup in children is a medical emergency requiring immediate treatment
Severity of Airway Obstruction
Mild
  • Occasional barking cough
  • Patient is comfortable, no cyanosis
  • Intermittent stridor may or may not be observed
  • Chest wall retractions minimal or none at all
Moderate
  • Frequent barking cough
  • Stridor persistent even at rest
  • Chest wall retractions at rest are observed, tracheal tug & nasal flaring present 
  • Tachycardia, labored breathing, increased respiratory rate
  • Irritable, little or no distress
  • Symptoms may progress to severe airway obstruction, careful observation is warranted
Severe
  • Frequent barking cough
  • Patient appears tired, easily irritated, lethargic & exhausted, restless & agitated
  • Persistent tachycardia
  • Prominent stridor even at rest (inspiratory w/ or w/o expiratory stridor)
  • Marked chest wall retractions, tracheal tug & nasal flaring present, markedly increased/decreased respiratory rate 

 Impending Resp Failure

  • Barking cough (may not be prominent)
  • Audible stridor at rest
  • Chest wall retractions
  • Irrational behavior, decreased level of consciousness
  • Hypotonia
  • Pallor, cyanosis w/o supplemental O2

Laboratory Tests

Oximetry
  • Determines oxygen saturation
  • Clinical assessment is more important than oximetry results
    • Patient w/ symptoms of severe respiratory obstruction may present w/ nearly normal oxygen saturation on oximetry


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