clostridium%20difficile%20infection
CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE INFECTION
Clostridium difficile infection is commonly associated with antibiotic treatment and is one of the most common nosocomial infections.
Symptoms usually start on days 4-9 of antibiotic treatment, but may also occur up to 8-10 weeks after discontinuation of antibiotics.
Discontinuation of antibiotics may be the only measure needed for patients with only mild diarrhea, no fever, no abdominal pain nor a high WBC count.
Cessation of antibiotics allows for reconstitution of the normal colonic microflora and markedly reduces risk of relapse.

Follow Up

Monitor Patient for Relapse

  • 20-25% of patients w/ C difficile infection will experience recurrent infection
    • Occurring <8 weeks after the onset of prior episode as long as symptoms of prior episode resolved after initial treatment was completed
  • Relapses are not usually due to development of antibiotic-resistant organisms
    • Usually due to germination of persistent spores in the colon after treatment or
    • Reinfection because of reingestion of the pathogen

Infection Control Measures

  • Proper handwashing between patient contacts must be observed
  • Isolate patients w/ C difficile-associated diarrhea
  • Use precautions when in contact w/ the infected patient & the environment
  • Objects & equipment must be properly disinfected
  • Educate patient & hospital staff regarding the disease
  • Judicious use of antibiotics must be exercised to prevent further cases of infection
Digital Edition
Asia's trusted medical magazine for healthcare professionals. Get your MIMS Gastroenterology - Malaysia digital copy today!
DOWNLOAD
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
12 May 2016

A study published in Science shows new strains of microbes from the donor were more likely to colonize the patient’s intestines if that particular species exists in the patient’s gut.

Rachel Soon, 18 Jan 2017

Patients infected with Helicobacter pylori strains derived from different geographical human ancestries than their own are likely to develop more severe symptoms which include gastric cancers, says an expert.

Jairia Dela Cruz, 19 Oct 2017
Having both type 1 diabetes and coeliac disease (CD) autoimmunity in early childhood appears to be more common than expected, with the development of islet autoantibodies (IAs) conferring a significant risk of subsequent tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGAs), according to data from the TEDDY* study.
Pank Jit Sin, 27 Dec 2017
The addition of synbiotics to the diet of adults suffering from functional constipation may lead to significant improvement in constipation syndroms.