Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a persistent, distressing, & severe pain of >6 month duration.
It occurs intermittently, cyclically, or situationally.
Localized to the pelvis, anterior abdominal wall at or below the umbilicus, the lumbosacral back, or the buttocks.
It is severe enough to cause functional disability or need medical care.
In women, CPP is not restricted to intercourse or menstruation & is not associated w/ pregnancy.
It is a symptom w/ a number of contributory factors & not a diagnosis; pathophysiology is complex & not well understood.
It is assumed that in the development of chronic pain, the nervous system is affected among others by inflammatory & chemical mediators & hormones.
A complex problem that is both multifactorial & multidimensional

Follow Up

  • Due to the multifactorial nature of chronic pelvic pain (CPP), diagnosis & treatment should always be reviewed to check for cases of treatment failure
    • May do re-evaluation & revision of treatment
    • Consider referral to a specialist if pain is still inadequately controlled
  • Follow-up may be long term in patients with complex conditions
    • Pain specialists to give pain assessment, management & rehabilitation that are interdisciplinary & multispecialized
    • Provide specialized support & secondary care to patients with complex needs
    • Provide complex interventions eg medical & cognitive behavioral
    • Consider available pain management facilities with appropriate staff
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