chlamydia%20-%20uncomplicated%20anogenital%20infection
CHLAMYDIA - UNCOMPLICATED ANOGENITAL INFECTION

Chlamydia is a gram negative obligate intracellular bacteria that causes sexually-transmitted infection.

Chlamydia trachomatis is the primary cause of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) in women which may lead to ectopic pregnancy, infertility, or chronic pelvic pain.
Most infected females are asymptomatic.
But some females may experience vaginal discharge, dysuria, lower abdominal pain, abnormal vaginal bleeding (postcoital or intermenstrual) or breakthrough bleeding, dyspareunia, conjunctivitis, proctitis and reactive arthritis.

Chlamydia%20-%20uncomplicated%20anogenital%20infection Patient Education

Patient Education

  • Patient needs to be informed about the nature of the infection and the importance of taking full course of the medication
  • Counsel patients on possible complications of STI

Advise patients on how to lower their risk of acquiring STIs:

  • Tailor counseling to the patient’s specific risk factors
  • Abstinence, condom use
  • Careful selection of partners
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