cellulitis_erysipelas
CELLULITIS/ERYSIPELAS
Cellulitis is a spreading bacterial skin infection that infects deeply involving the subcutaneous tissues.
It typically occurs in areas where the skin integrity has been compromised.
It may also result from blood-borne spread of infection to the skin and subcutaneous tissues.
It is commonly caused by beta-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus.
Erysipelas is a type of cellulitis with margins that are sharply demarcated, involves the epidermis and superficial lymphatics.
Onset of symptoms is acute whereas cellulitis has an indolent course.
It is more commonly caused by beta-hemolytic streptococci.

Patient Education

  • Advise on good personal hygiene and wound care
    • Cover draining wounds with clean bandage
    • Regularly bathe and wash hands after coming in contact with a wound
    • Avoid sharing or reusing items that came in contact with infected skin
    • Inspect interdigital toe spaces regularly especially if with lower extremity cellulitis
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