cellulitis_erysipelas
CELLULITIS/ERYSIPELAS
Cellulitis is a spreading bacterial skin infection that infects deeply involving the subcutaneous tissues.
It typically occurs in areas where the skin integrity has been compromised.
It may also result from blood-borne spread of infection to the skin and subcutaneous tissues.
It is commonly caused by beta-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus.
Erysipelas is a type of cellulitis with margins that are sharply demarcated, involves the epidermis and superficial lymphatics.
Onset of symptoms is acute whereas cellulitis has an indolent course.
It is more commonly caused by beta-hemolytic streptococci.

Differential Diagnosis

  • Necrotizing fasciitis
  • Toxic shock syndrome (TSS)
  • Erythema migrans
  • Gas gangrene
  • Contact dermatitis
  • Herpes zoster
  • Drugreaction, vaccination site reaction
  • Thrombophlebitis
  • Deep venous thrombosis (DVT)
  • Lymphedema
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