cellulitis_erysipelas%20(pediatric)
CELLULITIS/ERYSIPELAS (PEDIATRIC)
Cellulitis is an acute spreading skin infection that may go deep, involving the subcutaneous tissues.
It typically occurs in areas where the skin integrity has been compromised.
May result from blood-borne spread of infection to the skin and subcutaneous tissues.
It is commonly caused by beta-hemolytic streptococci and Staphylococcus aureus in adults and Haemophilus influenzae type B in patients <3 year of age.

Patient Education

  • Advise on good personal hygiene & wound care
    • Cover draining wounds w/ clean bandage
    • Regularly bathe & wash hands after coming in contact w/ a wound
    • Avoid sharing or reusing items that came in contact w/ infected skin
    • Inspect interdigital toe spaces regularly especially if w/ lower extremity cellulitis
  • Immobilization & elevation of affected limb
    • Effects: May help to decrease swelling & pain especially if used early in the course of treatment
  • Dressings
    • Cool sterile saline dressing may be applied
    • Effects: Removes purulent exudate from ulcers or infected abrasions, may help to decrease local pain 
  • Compression Stockings
    • May help w/ edema
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