cardiovascular%20disease%20prevention
CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE PREVENTION
Patients 18 years old and above should receive a risk factor assessment for cardiovascular disease (CVD) at every routine physician visit.
Cardiovascular disease development is closely related to lifestyle characteristics and associated risk factors.
There is an overwhelming scientific evidence that lifestyle modifications and reduction of risk factors can slow the development of CVD both before and after the occurrence of a cardiovascular event.
Very high-risk group refers to patients with documented CVD, by invasive or non-invasive testing, and with presence of risk factors.
High-risk patients are those who have already experienced a cardiovascular event or have very high levels of individual risk factors.
Moderate-risk patients require monitoring of risk profile every 6-12 months.
Low-risk patients may be given conservative management, focusing on lifestyle interventions.
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