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BRONCHITIS - CHRONIC IN ACUTE EXACERBATION

Chronic bronchitis is an infection of the trachea and bronchi for at least 3 consecutive months for more than 2 consecutive years.
The patient experiences symptoms of increase in dyspnea, sputum volume and sputum purulence over baseline on most days.

Diagnosis is basically based on clinical presentation.

Prevention

Influenza Vaccine

  • The use of an annual influenza vaccine for all patients with chronic bronchitis is strongly recommended
    • Patients with chronic lung disease have a higher risk of complications from influenza infection
    • Annual influenza vaccination decreases the morbidity and mortality of influenza in the elderly by 50%
  • See Influenza Disease Management Chart for complete details

Pneumococcal Vaccine

  • It is recommended that pneumococcal vaccine be administered at least once to patients with chronic bronchitis
    • Consider repeating vaccine every 5-10 years in high-risk patients
  • Pneumococcal vaccine is safe and may reduce invasive pneumococcal infection in patients with COPD
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