bronchiolitis
BRONCHIOLITIS
Bronchiolitis is a clinical diagnosis preceding upper respiratory illness and/or rhinorrhea.
Signs of respiratory illness which may include wheezing, retractions, oxygen desaturation, color change, nasal flaring.
There is also presence of apnea especially in premature or low birthweight infants, signs of dehydration and exposure to persons with viral upper respiratory infections.
Symptoms are usually worst on the 3rd-5th day of illness and then improve gradually.

Patient Education

  • Educate parents on the basic pathophysiology and expected clinical course of bronchiolitis
  • Educate parents on proper suctioning and airway maintenance techniques
    • Other respiratory care therapies eg chest physiotherapy, cool mist therapy and aerosol therapy are generally not helpful and therefore are not recommended
    • Deep and improper suctioning has been associated with longer hospital stay
  • Provide information on signs of progressing disease which would necessitate calling health care providers:
    • Increase in respiratory rate (RR) and accessory muscle use for respiration
    • Worsening general appearance
    • Inability to maintain an acceptable hydration status
  • Propping up the patient at an angle of 10-30° may ease breathing difficulty
  • Inform parents that symptoms of bronchiolitis (ie cough) usually resolves within 3 weeks from diagnosis
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