bronchiectasis
BRONCHIECTASIS
Bronchiectasis is an irreversible pathologic dilatation or ectasia of the bronchi due to repeated airway infection and inflammation.
It enhances susceptibility to bronchial infection and increases inflammatory reaction which causes further lung damage.
Classic symptoms of of bronchiectasis are cough with chronic sputum production along with recurring infective exacerbations and hemoptysis.

Supportive Therapy

Specific Therapy for Individual Causes
Hypogammaglobulinemia
  • Administer IV immunoglobulins w/ guidance & supervision from an immunologist
Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia
  • More intensive therapy based on the assumption that disease progression is more likely
  • Emphasis on physical therapy
TB, HIV, Rheumatoid arthritis, Sarcoidosis
  • Treat active associated disease
  • Bronchiectasis may precede, accompany or follow the development of associated disease
Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA)
  • Control of asthma & prevention of damage from acute exacerbations of ABPA
  • Consider maintenance oral corticosteroids
  • Antifungal therapy remains 2nd-line choice, unless there is associated invasive Aspergillosis
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