bradycardia
BRADYCARDIA

Bradycardia is having a heart rate of <60 beats/minute that may not affect the hemodynamic status of some patients.
A heart rate that is inadequate for the patient's current condition and may not be able to support life is a clinically significant bradycardia.

Bradycardia can be caused by problems in the sinoatrial node, problems in the conduction pathways of the heart, metabolic problems or heart attack/disease that caused damage to the heart.

The different types of bradycardia are sinus bradycardia, sick sinus syndrome, tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome, hypersensitive carotid sinus syndrome, sinus pause/arrest, sinoatrial node exit block and atrioventricular block.

Bradycardia Signs and Symptoms

Definition

  • Any rhythm disorder with a sinus rate of <50 beats/minute (bpm)
  • May not affect hemodynamic status of some patients
Clinically Significant Bradycardia
  • Heart rate is inadequate for the patient’s current condition and may be unable to support life
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