blepharitis
BLEPHARITIS
Blepharitis is an inflammation process affecting the eyelid margins, eyelash follicles or openings of the anteriorly-placed accessory lacrimal glands and the posteriorly-placed Meibomian glands that causes ocular irritation and redness acutely but usually chronically.
It may have periods of exacerbations and remissions.
It usually occurs in middle-aged adults but can also start in childhood.
Can affect vision by disrupting the surface of the cornea and the bulbar conjunctiva; may influence tear film composition.

Patient Education

  • It is important that the patient understands that cure may not be possible in most cases because of the chronic nature of blepharitis, uncertain etiology & frequent coexistence of ocular surface disease
    • Symptoms can be improved but are rarely eliminated
    • Possible recurrence even after symptoms have resolved

  • Regular follow-up is essential to assess the efficacy of treatment
  • Use of ocular cosmetics (eg mascara & eye liner) should be discouraged during treatment
  • Avoid using contact lenses during treatment
  • Omega-3 dietary supplements demonstrated an improvement in the tear film break-up time, ocular surface disease index, & meibum score particularly to its anti-inflammatory properties
  • Punctal plugs can be used in patients w/ coexisting dry eye syndrome once inflammation controlled
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