Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a histopathological diagnosis characterized by epithelial cell & smooth muscle cell proliferation in the transition zone of the prostate leading to a non-malignant enlargement of the gland, which may result in lower urinary tract symptoms, including voiding and storage symptoms.
It is commonly called enlarged prostate.
Etiology is unknown but due to its similarity to the embryonic morphogenesis of the prostate has led to the hypothesis that BPH may be the result of "reawakening" in adulthood of embryonic induction processes.

Lifestyle Modification

  • Reduce intake of liquids, particularly before going out in public or before periods of sleep
  • Avoid or reduce intake of caffeinated or alcoholic beverages
  • Avoid or monitor use of medications such as decongestants, antihistamines, antidepressants, & diuretics
  • Train the bladder to hold more urine for longer periods
  • Exercise pelvic floor muscles (Kegel exercise)
  • Prevent or treat constipation
  • Try to urinate at least once every 3 hours
  • “Double voiding” may help - after urinating, wait, & try to urinate again
  • Try to achieve & maintain a healthy weight
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