asthma%20(pediatric)
ASTHMA (PEDIATRIC)

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in the lungs of children and adults.
The patient usually complains of shortness of breath, chest tightness and coughing with wheezing.

A diagnosis of asthma in young children is more likely if they have symptom patterns, presence of risk factors for development of asthma and therapeutic response to controller treatment.
Goals of treatment are effective symptom control with minimal or no exacerbations, minimal or no nocturnal and daytime symptoms, no limitations on activities, minimal or no need for reliever treatment, and minimal adverse effects of medication.

Asthma%20(pediatric) Patient Education

Patient Education

  • Includes skills training, symptom monitoring, and a written personal asthma action plan 
  • Aims to actively involve the children, their families and caregivers in managing asthma
  • Education should be provided over several visits
    • Studies have shown that asthma control is improved with the use of written asthma management plan together with careful verbal explanation of the treatment regimen
  • Develop patient/doctor partnership
    • Objective is to give patients the ability to control their asthma with guidance from health care professionals 
  • The patient, parents and caregivers should be able to apply the following objectives
    • Avoid triggers and aggravating factors
    • Take medications accurately and appropriately
    • Understand the difference between “controller” and “reliever” medications
    • Train about correct inhalation technique
    • Monitor asthma control status
    • Recognize signs of worsening asthma and take appropriate action
    • Seek medical help when necessary

Written Asthma Action Plan

  • May help patients and patient's parents/guardian/caregiver recognize and respond appropriately to an asthma attack
  • Should include specific, individualized instructions about medications and medical care access
  • Changes to medications may include the following:
    • Increasing as-needed inhaled low-dose corticosteroid-Formoterol doses
    • The use of an inhaler containing rapid-onset long-acting beta2-agonist with low-dose corticosteroid
    • Other inhaled corticosteroids and inhaled corticosteroid-long-acting beta2-agonist maintenance controlled regimens
    • A short-course oral corticosteroids for patients unresponsive to increased doses of reliever and controller medications, rapid deterioration, PEF or FEV1 <60% of personal best, or a history of sudden severe exacerbations
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