antiretroviral%20therapy%20for%20hiv-infected%20adults
ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY FOR HIV-INFECTED ADULTS
Antiretroviral therapy is recommended for all HIV-infected individuals regardless of CD4 count to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with HIV infection.
Goals of antiretroviral treatment are suppression of viral load for maximum possible duration, restore & preserve immunologic function, reduce HIV-related morbidity & mortality and prevent HIV transmission.
Urgent initiation of antiretroviral treatment is recommended in the following individuals: pregnant women, patients w/ HIV with coinfections (HBV, HCV, active tuberculosis), AIDS-defining illness, HIV-associated nephropathy, low CD4 counts, acute opportunistic infections and HIV HBV with evidence of chronic liver disease.

Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV-Infected Adults References

  1. Williams I, Churchill D, Anderson J, et al. British HIV Association guidelines for the treatment of HIV-1-positive adults with antiretroviral therapy 2012. HIV Medicine. 2012 Sep;13:1-85. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-1293.2012.01029_1.x. Accessed 17 Sep 2012. PMID: 22830364
  2. Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Revised recommendations for HIV testing of adults, adolescents, and pregnant women in health-care settings. MMWR. 2006 Sep;55:1-17. Accessed 18 Sep 2012. PMID: 16988643
  3. Coffey S. Antiretroviral therapy. AETC National Resource Center. http://www.aidsetc.org. Jun 2012. Accessed 26 Sep 2012.
  4. World Health Organization. Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: summary of key features and recommendations. WHO. http://www.who.int/. Jun 2013. Accessed 01 Oct 2013.
  5. World Health Organization. Antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in adults and adolescents: recommendations for a public health approach: 2010 revision. WHO. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/. 2010. Accessed 2 Jun 2015.
  6. World Health Organization, UNAIDS. Guidance on provider- initiated HIV testing and counselling in health facilities. WHO. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/. 2007.
  7. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1- selected adults and adolescents. Department of Health and Human Services. AIDSInfo. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/. Accessed 2 Jun 2015.
  8. World Health Organization. WHO case definitions of HIV for surveillance and revised clinical staging and immunological classification of HIV-related disease in adults and children. WHO. http://www.who.int/. 2007. Accessed 24 Sep 2012.
  9. World Health Organization. HIV/AIDS Fact sheet N°360. WHO. http://www.who.int. 2015. Accessed 2 Jun 2015.
  10. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-selected adults and adolescents. Department of Health and Human Services. AIDSInfo. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/. 28 Jan 2016. Accessed 29 Mar 2016.
  11. European AIDS Clinical Society. European Guidelines for treatment of HIV-positive adults in Europe. Version 8.2. European AIDS Clinical Society. http://www.eacsociety.org/. Jan 2017.
  12. Fletcher CV. Overview of antiretroviral agents used to treat HIV. UpToDate. https://www.uptodate.com/. Aug 2017. Accessed 08 Sep 2017.
  13. Günthard HF, Saag MS, Benson CA, et al. Antiretroviral drugs for treatment and prevention of HIV infection in adults: 2016 recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel. JAMA. 2016 Jul;316(2):191-210. doi: 10.1001/jama.2016.8900. PMID: 27404187
  14. Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents. Guidelines for the use of antiretroviral agents in HIV-1-selected adults and adolescents. Department of Health and Human Services. AIDSInfo. https://aidsinfo.nih.gov/. 2017.
  15. World Health Organization. Consolidated guidelines on HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and care for key populations. 2016 update. WHO. http://www.who.int/. 2016.
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