age-related%20macular%20degeneration
AGE-RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION
Age-related macular degeneration is a common, chronic, progressive, degenerative disease that causes central loss of vision due to abnormalities that occurs in the pigment, neural and vascular layers of the macula.
The macular disorder may have one or more of the following:
- Formation of drusen which are localized deposits of extracellular material usually concentrated in the macula
- Abnormalities in the retinal pigment epithelium (eg hypopigmentation or hyperpigmentation)
- Retinal pigment epithelium and choriocapillaris geographic atrophy
- Neovascular (exudative) maculopathy
Decreased central vision and distortion of seeing straight lines are the most common symptoms.
1
Editor's Recommendations
Most Read Articles
Jairia Dela Cruz, 26 Mar 2019
Once-daily dosing of the Rho kinase inhibitor netarsudil is not inferior to twice-daily timolol in terms of lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) in patients with open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension, while having tolerable adverse events, according to the results of the phase III ROCKET-4 trial.
22 Oct 2018
Transdermal androgen appears beneficial to ageing patients with sex hormone deficiency-associated dry eye, with a recent study showing that short-term treatment relieves both symptoms and signs of the condition, as well as improves quality of life (QOL). These benefits are achieved without increasing the incidence of serious side effects.