acne%20vulgaris
ACNE VULGARIS
Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory dermatosis which is notable for open and/or closed comedones (blackheads and whiteheads) and inflammatory lesions including papules, pustules or nodules.
Mild acne has <20 comedones or <15 inflammatory lesions or <30 total lesion count.
Moderate acne has 20-100 comedones or 15-20 inflammatory lesions or 30-125 total lesion count.
Severe papules/pustules or nodulocystic acne is the acne resistant to topical treatment or if scarring/nodular lesions are present.

Patient Education

  • Good communication between clinician & patient is important
    • Noncompliance is the most common cause of treatment failure
    • Adolescents may be sensitive to actual or supposed lack of acceptance on the part of their physicians
    • By giving the patient clear guidelines & realistic expectations, noncompliance can be avoided
  • Patient should be made aware that treatment will control acne, not cure it
    • Many acne sufferers expect to be disappointed w/ the results of treatment
    • Long-term therapy is required to control lesions
    • Acne tends to be less active as age increases

Dispel Common Myths

  • Teach patient that acne is not caused by dirt or diet
  • Let patient know that acne medication will take up to 8-12 wk to work & there is no “quick-fix”
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